Preston - our head office

Preston Marina

Unit 7, Navigation Business Village
Navigation Way
Preston
Lancashire
PR2 2YP

Contact details

Tel: 01772 378 020

Fax: 01772 483 375

Directions:

Our head office is located at the marina end of Preston Docks (the opposite end from the ODEON Cinema). We are conveniently located on a business park and have plenty of visitor parking available, which is designated with a number 7. Please note there is another business park on the same side as Baffito’s (an Italian restaurant), we are on the business park on the opposite side to this. If using Sat Nav - this is the one, it will take you to.

There is a McDonald’s Drive-thru close by to us from one side and from the other direction, a coffee shop inside a sailing shop located on the side of the marina. Across the road is the Italian, with a pub and a Chiquito at the end of the docks, close to the ODEON Cinema (which also has a Costa Coffee located inside).

A brief history of Preston Docks

Preston Docks

The River Ribble was diverted in 1893, to allow for the dock to be dug out and built. In 1885 the foundation stone was laid by Queen Victoria’s first son, Albert Edward the Prince of Wales. One of the basins was also named after him, the Albert Edward basin which is 3,000ft long by 600ft wide and was the largest single dock in Europe. It was completed and opened in 1892 by Alfred, the Duke of Edinburgh and Queen Victoria’s second son.

EH Booth & Co Ltd chartered the first ship to visit the docks, a company with links to the current BOOTHS, which is still based in Preston. Preston Docks provided a place to import cotton, timber, coal, china clay, wood pulp, fruit and oil. As the docks developed in the first half of the 20th century, warehouses were built, and a railway line was installed to connect the Dock to the rest of the country. After the Second World War, the dock pioneered roll-on roll-off ferries, with a service bringing lorries from Northern Ireland. This partly led to the dock’s most successful period as a working port, from 1960-1972.

The decline of the Dock’s traditional role came with a series of strikes in the 1970s. As the size of ships began to increase, the channel was too shallow for the newer, bigger ships to navigate. On the 31st October 1981 by an Act of Parliament, Preston Docks officially ceased to be a working port. Today Preston Docks has been transformed into a commercial and leisure hub, drawing in a whole new form of industry and employment. The railway is used today for commercial freight and steam excursions. Preston Docks are one of the prime residential areas in Preston. The flats on the Docks are one of the most desirable areas to live in Preston. The basin itself has now been turned into a luxury marina, drawing in tourists and boating clubs.